XVIII International AIDS Conference

Abstract

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The arts and communities HIV, harm reduction and human rights expertise, can enable social and policy change. Collaborative community art is a dynamic form of activism, that enables an unvetted insight into the social inequality and lack of cultural democracy within the HIV sector

K. Davis

GloballyAware, Art Advocates AIDS Awareness, Bali, Indonesia

Issues: Community art processes are a proven catalyst, for direct and unmediated insights into the unique knowledge of HIV/AIDS communities by represent themselves. Through utilising their authentic expertise in HIV, Harm Reduction and Human Rights issues, we can enable responsive social and policy change.
Description: GloballyAwareArt enables this change. Using collaborative arts process, HIV affected community tell their stories as individuals, family members and health service providers/users. Optimum outcomes require the arts practitioner to be immersed in the community, work cross-culturally and ensure a safe environment for participants to commit fully.
Since 2006, over 1500 HIV affected people have created truly amazing artwork in jungles, temples, conferences, studios and villages in 30 countries worldwide. AIDS08Mexico; GloballyAwareArt exhibition was viewed by 25,000 delegates. “Universal Action Now” was created for the backdrop to AIDSo8 closing ceremony. At ICAAP09Bali “Cremation of Discrimination” was installed, APNSW09Bangkok “Positive Sex Workers Human Rights” was created/exhibited, and Artsprocess was the vehicle used to engender Positive Sex Workers Human Rights Declaration.
Lessons learned: Exposing hidden truths in a vibrant, poignant and authentic way as collaborative art narratives leads to change. HIV affected people show a profound understanding of the complexities of HIV, pinpointing counterproductive responses, opening dialogue and forming dynamic networks that advocate for responsive policy shifts to meet their changing needs. The process is as important as the outcome.
Next steps:
1. Working with IHRA on 7countries2create7collaborative Artworks that address 21yrs of HIV, Harm Reduction and Human Rights.
2. Developing a HIV retreat in Bali incorporating Art and psychosocial support; mentoring village leaders to encourage an understanding HIV, Harm Reduction and Human Rights that replaces myths with facts.
3. Develop research further to validate the importance of the Arts in AIDS prevention; external documentation into the process.
4. Creating a body of work that addresses concerns of PLHA in the Asian/Pacific Region.


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